MEZZANINE FLOOR REGULATIONS - FLOOR REGULATIONS


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Mezzanine Floor Regulations





mezzanine floor regulations






    mezzanine floor
  • mezzanine: intermediate floor just above the ground floor

  • In architecture, a mezzanine or entresol is an intermediate floor between main floors of a building, and therefore typically not counted among the overall floors of a building. Often, a mezzanine is low-ceilinged and projects in the form of a balcony.

  • (Mezzanine Floors) An intermediate floor or floors between the ground and roof level in your building, utilising the available headroom fully. Available in a range of load bearing capacities they can provide space for offices, storage or production and can be served by staircases or lifts.





    regulations
  • In accordance with regulations; of the correct type

  • (regulation) an authoritative rule

  • (regulation) prescribed by or according to regulation; "regulation army equipment"

  • (regulation) rule: a principle or condition that customarily governs behavior; "it was his rule to take a walk before breakfast"; "short haircuts were the regulation"

  • A rule or directive made and maintained by an authority

  • Of a familiar or predictable type; formulaic; standardized











mezzanine floor regulations - Brady 116235




Brady 116235 10" Width x 7" Height B-563 Plastic, Black On Yellow Color Sustainable Safety Sign, Legend "Caution Area In Front Of Electrical Panel Must Be Kept Clear For 36 Inches-OSHA NEC Regulations"


Brady 116235 10" Width x 7" Height B-563 Plastic, Black On Yellow Color Sustainable Safety Sign, Legend "Caution Area In Front Of Electrical Panel Must Be Kept Clear For 36 Inches-OSHA NEC Regulations"



Brady signs feature bright colors, bold text and intuitive pictographs to ensure that the communication is highly visible and easily understood. The signs are compliant with the latest standards and regulations, and designed to withstand even the harshest industrial environments. Electrical hazard signs should be used throughout your facility to identify areas with a potential for electrical hazard and high voltage. Brady offers a variety of electrical warning signs, including high voltage signs, electricity danger signs, and other electrical signs to warn against entry, machine operation and buried cables. Brady's electrical hazards signs are available in highly visible, bright colors with pictograms and legends designed to communicate specific electrical warnings.










79% (18)





Bush Tower




Bush Tower





42nd Street, Midtown Manhattan, New York City

The Bush Tower, designed by the prominent architectural firm of Helmle & Corbett and built in 1916-18 (added to in 1921) was an influential prototype for set-back skyscrapers, even though it was designed prior to the adoption of the 1916 law mandating the set-back form; the setbacks of the Bush Tower were described by Corbett as a purely architectural and aesthetic solution.

Combining historical neo-Gothic detailing with a modem, pronounced vertical emphasis, the building represents an important intermediate stage in the development of the skyscraper. Secondary elevations finished with an innovative treatment of trompe l'oeil colored brick piers, and the engineering solutions for the tower-like steel-frame building erected on a very narrow plot were features of interest.

Built for the Bush Terminal Company, the Bush Terminal International Exhibit Building and Buyers Club, as the building was originally named, housed merchandise showrooms located for the convenience of out-of-town buyers in midtown Manhattan. Two ten-story wings facing 41st Street, also designed by Helmle & Corbett, continue the simplified neo-Gothic style of the thirty-story tower.

The design of the Bush Tower reflects an important intermediate stage in the development of the skyscraper, a transition from the historically inspired structures built prior to World War I and the post-war towers characterized by vertical articulation. The Bush Tower combines neo-Gothic ornamentation with a pronounced vertical emphasis.

The neo-Gothic street level facade was a refinement of an earlier design, more typical of the period, into a restrained statement where Gothic detailing supported another, more dominant design program. And although Corbett simplified prototypes, most notably the Woolworth Building (architect Cass Gilbert, 1913; a designated New York City Landmark), and made the Gothic elements enhance his emphasis on verticality, he had yet to take the step that Raymond Hood took in 1923 with the American Radiator Company Building (a designated New York City Landmark) in modernizing the neo-Gothic language.

The domination of historical ornamentation by a vertical emphasis also blurred the classically-inspired traditional division of the tower into thirds, and some vertical lines are carried from base to top. Piers at the street level were carried upward as ribs articulating the main shaft of the tower, and merged, into pinnacles in the Gothic detailing at the top of the building. In Corbett's words, "The whole mass of the building [was], of course, vertical, and everything possible in designing was done to accentuate this vertical ity."

Corbett saw his skyscraper as a "towering mass" with four sides, not an infill tower with one street facade. In 1926, in an article for the Saturday Evening Post, he described the design problem for the layman:

We wanted to make the structure a model for the tall, narrow building in the center of a city block. We were determined it should be a thing complete in itself, with fine, clean uprising lines; a building that could be looked at from every angle, sides and back as well as front, rather than a long peppermint box on end with holes punched in the sides for windows and a stray gumdrop on top by way of a water tank. ...Part of our scheme was an appropriate finish for the top which should give the entire building the appearance of a soaring cathedral tower.

In his three-dimensional approach to the building, the side elevations presented a design challenge; the decision had been made to build to the lot line which prevented the use of windows or projecting architectural elements. The solution, the use of trompe l'oeil piers of colored brick to divide the remaining wall area into vertical sections, was an often imitated device used by tall building designers in New York City. Corbett described the design process:

...the architects made drawings of the side walls as though the building stood free all round with plenty of room for reveals and projections. The drawing was then rendered to shadows at forty-five degrees, the shadows being in dark and the highlights in white. The drawings was then interpreted in brick of buff color for the general field, white for highlights, and black for shadows.

The Bush Tower was predicted, at the time of its construction, to be the last of the skyscrapers due to the adoption of the 1916 zoning ordinance. In fact, Corbett's design soon came to be regarded as a prototype of set-back design, a building of the future rather than of the past.

Although some of his contemporaries suspected that Corbett was thinking of forthcoming set-back requirements when he designed the Bush Tower, the set-back design was a visual choice. Corbett wrote:

The building [was] not, as sometimes supposed, the first example of the new set-back idea resulting from the New York Zoning law. Plans for the











Bush Tower




Bush Tower





130-132 West 42nd Street, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Bush Tower, designed by the prominent architectural firm of Helmle & Corbett and built in 1916-18 (added to in 1921) was an influential prototype for set-back skyscrapers, even though it was designed prior to the adoption of the 1916 law mandating the set-back form; the setbacks of the Bush Tower were described by Corbett as a purely architectural and aesthetic solution.

Combining historical neo-Gothic detailing with a modem, pronounced vertical emphasis, the building represents an important intermediate stage in the development of the skyscraper. Secondary elevations finished with an innovative treatment of trompe l'oeil colored brick piers, and the engineering solutions for the tower-like steel-frame building erected on a very narrow plot were features of interest.

Built for the Bush Terminal Company, the Bush Terminal International Exhibit Building and Buyers Club, as the building was originally named, housed merchandise showrooms located for the convenience of out-of-town buyers in midtown Manhattan. Two ten-story wings facing 41st Street, also designed by Helmle & Corbett, continue the simplified neo-Gothic style of the thirty-story tower.

The design of the Bush Tower reflects an important intermediate stage in the development of the skyscraper, a transition from the historically inspired structures built prior to World War I and the post-war towers characterized by vertical articulation. The Bush Tower combines neo-Gothic ornamentation with a pronounced vertical emphasis.

The neo-Gothic street level facade was a refinement of an earlier design, more typical of the period, into a restrained statement where Gothic detailing supported another, more dominant design program. And although Corbett simplified prototypes, most notably the Woolworth Building (architect Cass Gilbert, 1913; a designated New York City Landmark), and made the Gothic elements enhance his emphasis on verticality, he had yet to take the step that Raymond Hood took in 1923 with the American Radiator Company Building (a designated New York City Landmark) in modernizing the neo-Gothic language.

The domination of historical ornamentation by a vertical emphasis also blurred the classically-inspired traditional division of the tower into thirds, and some vertical lines are carried from base to top. Piers at the street level were carried upward as ribs articulating the main shaft of the tower, and merged, into pinnacles in the Gothic detailing at the top of the building. In Corbett's words, "The whole mass of the building [was], of course, vertical, and everything possible in designing was done to accentuate this vertical ity."

Corbett saw his skyscraper as a "towering mass" with four sides, not an infill tower with one street facade. In 1926, in an article for the Saturday Evening Post, he described the design problem for the layman:

We wanted to make the structure a model for the tall, narrow building in the center of a city block. We were determined it should be a thing complete in itself, with fine, clean uprising lines; a building that could be looked at from every angle, sides and back as well as front, rather than a long peppermint box on end with holes punched in the sides for windows and a stray gumdrop on top by way of a water tank. ...Part of our scheme was an appropriate finish for the top which should give the entire building the appearance of a soaring cathedral tower.

In his three-dimensional approach to the building, the side elevations presented a design challenge; the decision had been made to build to the lot line which prevented the use of windows or projecting architectural elements. The solution, the use of trompe l'oeil piers of colored brick to divide the remaining wall area into vertical sections, was an often imitated device used by tall building designers in New York City. Corbett described the design process:

...the architects made drawings of the side walls as though the building stood free all round with plenty of room for reveals and projections. The drawing was then rendered to shadows at forty-five degrees, the shadows being in dark and the highlights in white. The drawings was then interpreted in brick of buff color for the general field, white for highlights, and black for shadows.

The Bush Tower was predicted, at the time of its construction, to be the last of the skyscrapers due to the adoption of the 1916 zoning ordinance. In fact, Corbett's design soon came to be regarded as a prototype of set-back design, a building of the future rather than of the past.

Although some of his contemporaries suspected that Corbett was thinking of forthcoming set-back requirements when he designed the Bush Tower, the set-back design was a visual choice. Corbett wrote:

The building [was] not, as sometimes supposed, the first example of the new set-back idea resulting from t









mezzanine floor regulations








mezzanine floor regulations




Chaos -CTR  Chinook Multi Tasker Pro Micro Fleece Balaclava with Windproof Face Mask, Black, Large/X-Large






This micro fleece multi-functional balaclava has a hinge that allows you to move the windproof face mask up and down with ease. The Chinook Multi-Tasker Pro can be worn as balaclava, a balaclava with face mask or as a neck gaiter. The Windshield waterproof breathable fabric will keep your face warm in the coldest climate and the Lycra binding around the face seals out the elements for complete protection. The shaped bottom provides full coverage and prevents excessive gathering. This product is excellent for skiing, snowboarding, snow machining, hunting and all other cold weather activities.










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